Winston Churchill – Wire Book

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We Are

Masters of the

Unsaid Words,

but Slaves

of Those

We Let

Slip Out

While I have already made a digital collection of my prints in book form, each of the pages baring a quote that is different to read, my next evolution of my work would to take the wire quotes from the canvases and to compile and compress them into a form where texts are commonly found: book. This new form will contain pages all of which will have a minimum of two words, sewed in with wire onto black fabric pages, and bound together with thick black thread in a Japanese style binding. The quote that I will be selecting will be not one of an art quote, rather a quote by Winston Churchill, it will read We Are Masters of the Unsaid Words, but Slaves to Those We Let Slip Out. Without baring a cover the first words in view sharply reads out, We Are, this serves to draw the viewers and readers in and to question: we are what?

The words We Are, will encourage the reader to touch, open and turn the pages, this feature differs from my previously works all which are canvases upon walls, only to be looked at. Each minimal style and wording and the bright bold colours of the texts draws and absorbs the reader’s attention. Each of the pages of texts will bare its own colour. The words of the pages are hidden unless the participant is willing to continue reading by turning the pages over, the next words within the sentence will be left unknown; this again differs from the usage of the canvases, as they are seen like any painting upon the wall, the words strong and portraying a message.

It’s interesting to note that because each of the individual pages contain fewer than three words, the reader will read the words with sharp pauses rather than reading the whole message with a simple flow unlike the canvas works upon the wall. The entire quote is broken down, no matter how short it may be. This shows that the format would not only serve to separate and breaking down the quote but it also happens to change the way the words are absorbs and taken in.

zoe_wong-wirebook1 page 1 zoe_wong-wirebook1 page 2  zoe_wong-wirebook1 page 3 zoe_wong-wirebook1 page 4 zoe_wong-wirebook1 page 5 zoe_wong-wirebook1 page 6 zoe_wong-wirebook1 page 7

Oscar Wilde – Results of an Unique Temperament

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Oscar Wilde – “A Work of art is the unique result of a unique temperament.”

zoe_wong oscarwilde 4

More digital manipulation.

Each artwork is unique is its own right, and so is its creator: the artist. This quote I feel appeals to the styling and the variety of practices that any artist might have chosen, in which medium to make, the sizing, the performance and the delivery of the artwork to the audiences. And of course, I have created and experimented on different ways in which I express the thought.

zoe_wong oscarwilde 1

zoe_wong oscarwilde 2

Francis Bacon – Wire Quote

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Substituting embossing powder for black wire, the quote I used is The Job of the Artist is to Deepen the Mystery, this quote is by Francis Bacon, which is painstakingly hand stitched. This quote reminded me of the way art has changed over time, particularly abstract art, and how the Modernism has changed how art is seen and paving a way for new art and new exciting formats and experimentations. I felt this quote was appropriate as this is another of my experimentation of the visibility of text and how readable it can be. Like the canvases mentioned before, they make the viewer or reader to concentrate and get close to the piece in order to completely understand and decode what is written there, the words are near invisible when looked upon at a distance.

Z_wong fbacon wirequote   Z_wong fbacon wirequote closeup

Arthur Schopenhauer – Treat a work of art like a prince. Like it speak to you first.

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Arthur Schopenhauer – “Treat a work of art like a prince. Like it speak to you first.”

This quote I find interesting because it speaks and reflects both the artist and the viewer alike, and both having different reactions. As the manipulator I have paid attention to the word ‘speak’, presenting the quote to be loud and merging perhaps too much in with the background, while the next experiment is loud and somewhat bashful, standing and shouting to the viewer.

Figure 7

Figure 8