Friedrich Nietzsche – Wire Quote

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After creating the first large piece (see previous post), I wanted to instantly to create a collection, whether or not I was going to use it, I more or less would like to personally keep it for myself. And so on towards the second, I’ve picked out a quote that I have already used before by Friedrich Nietzsche: No artist tolerates reality. This quote I had used before within the last year onto smaller sized canvas (see previous post), have now been reused onto to large A3 size. The colour, size and the material of the text has been altered, which appears to effect the dynamic piece as a whole when compared to both the pervious A3 canvas and the smaller A5 canvas. The quote is much shorter than the first A3 canvas, therefore it was unnecessary for it to fill up the entire canvas as I previously had. zoe_wong wire quote-tolerate reality The colour scheme changed with the wiring, instead of having each word with an individually set colour, I have instead, coordinate each of the lettering of the word to have its own colour. The words appear more vibrant and the eyes wonder upon the whole piece as a whole in a different way, the colour each have the power to draw in and misplacing the viewers’ gaze. From the experience of working with many coloured wire, I had formularised and split of which of the colours that are more eye catching than others.

The new colour scheme is design as a sort of a play on the word ‘reality’; by this I mean that the word reality in general means ‘real’, ‘actual’, ‘fact’, ‘real world’, ‘authenticity’, ‘certainty’, ‘the here and now’, ‘idealism’, ‘life’; however the word also means an individual’s own perception of what is real, whether an artist or not. And so the idea of having the colours to be randomised is to say that each colour has its own element about life, each person is their own and personal. By mixing it all up all the elements don’t sit in its rightful place, as opposed to the lettering colour scheme of the first canvas. If the quote sits true, then I feel that my second canvas, is rooted in what an artists’ mind-set should be.

That said, I was aiming that the mix of colours would give an aura of surrealism. Because the colours are eye catching they remind me of artists’ taking influence from advertising and billboards, which in opinion, gives the work its own charm, as a piece of advertising it must be eye catching and memorable, to do this an artist create their own self style that can easily be referred or be known as their own branding, just like how a painter paints a certain portraits in a style or angle and light.

Most text artists create what is known to be their own font and wording style through this. The creation of the artist own text is not only limited to the use of fonts, but also platform, size, and colour. Ed Ruscha way of working would have a short narrative upon a singular or limited colour background. Barbara Kruger’s aggressive and accusing words comes to mind. Her way of enlarging and plotting upon the exhibition space has imprinted strongly in my mind. It is the same as the way Bob and Roberta Smith’s painted letter to Michael Gove. Both of their body of works are presenting a message, in a non-nonsense and accusing sort of way.

Francis Bacon – Wire Quote

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Substituting embossing powder for black wire, the quote I used is The Job of the Artist is to Deepen the Mystery, this quote is by Francis Bacon, which is painstakingly hand stitched. This quote reminded me of the way art has changed over time, particularly abstract art, and how the Modernism has changed how art is seen and paving a way for new art and new exciting formats and experimentations. I felt this quote was appropriate as this is another of my experimentation of the visibility of text and how readable it can be. Like the canvases mentioned before, they make the viewer or reader to concentrate and get close to the piece in order to completely understand and decode what is written there, the words are near invisible when looked upon at a distance.

Z_wong fbacon wirequote   Z_wong fbacon wirequote closeup

Michelangelo – Wire Quote

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This is the next series of my experimentation of texts which I had been working on for a few months now, in which I move away from my earlier work of digital manipulation and start working onto something more physical. But that doesn’t mean that I have moved completely away from Photoshop, this is just how my work has been evolving. Particularly using the power of technology to destroy and then trying to mend using different materials, and how has that effect the pieces.

With Photoshop I am able to alter the text in ways that I have never done before, such as taking away and stripping down, which is difficult to achieve when physically altering it by hand. By doing this I am obscuring the viewers’ ability to read the quote, which in turn questions the purpose of the text, if it cannot be read then is it still regarded as a piece of text, or has that changed the text into an unlikely image. However if the audience is able to decode the text and is able to read it then does it still keep its purpose? Or does it take on the role of an image as oppose to being just texts.

Michelangelo was known to be sexist and completely is obsessed with the male beauty, to the point that he would use only male models even when painting or sculpting female figures, he thought that males were at the top of the food chain and females beneath. From my earlier experiments I used Photoshop to perform a series of different experiments in which I either stripped the text apart or layered on top of it to the point of difficultly in reading.

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Using technology to strip away the power of the text and then attempting to mend it back, by using the old way of fixing clothing, which is stitching; by stitching I am bringing back the old traditions. Stitching is an important tool that we still use today. The whole point to stitch is to fix and mend, which is an important trait for women up until the 20th century, to weave the stitching into an attractive pattern is an added bonus, making them more attractive and eligible for marriage.

When stitching with wire I intend to mend the faded, barely-there text but instead of choosing sewing thread the material I choose was beading wire, as I didn’t want the final results to appear perfect, therefore breaking the tradition that the roles and intentions of stitching and sewing and of women.

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