Winston Churchill – Wire Book

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We Are

Masters of the

Unsaid Words,

but Slaves

of Those

We Let

Slip Out

While I have already made a digital collection of my prints in book form, each of the pages baring a quote that is different to read, my next evolution of my work would to take the wire quotes from the canvases and to compile and compress them into a form where texts are commonly found: book. This new form will contain pages all of which will have a minimum of two words, sewed in with wire onto black fabric pages, and bound together with thick black thread in a Japanese style binding. The quote that I will be selecting will be not one of an art quote, rather a quote by Winston Churchill, it will read We Are Masters of the Unsaid Words, but Slaves to Those We Let Slip Out. Without baring a cover the first words in view sharply reads out, We Are, this serves to draw the viewers and readers in and to question: we are what?

The words We Are, will encourage the reader to touch, open and turn the pages, this feature differs from my previously works all which are canvases upon walls, only to be looked at. Each minimal style and wording and the bright bold colours of the texts draws and absorbs the reader’s attention. Each of the pages of texts will bare its own colour. The words of the pages are hidden unless the participant is willing to continue reading by turning the pages over, the next words within the sentence will be left unknown; this again differs from the usage of the canvases, as they are seen like any painting upon the wall, the words strong and portraying a message.

It’s interesting to note that because each of the individual pages contain fewer than three words, the reader will read the words with sharp pauses rather than reading the whole message with a simple flow unlike the canvas works upon the wall. The entire quote is broken down, no matter how short it may be. This shows that the format would not only serve to separate and breaking down the quote but it also happens to change the way the words are absorbs and taken in.

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Michelangelo – Wire Quote

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This is the next series of my experimentation of texts which I had been working on for a few months now, in which I move away from my earlier work of digital manipulation and start working onto something more physical. But that doesn’t mean that I have moved completely away from Photoshop, this is just how my work has been evolving. Particularly using the power of technology to destroy and then trying to mend using different materials, and how has that effect the pieces.

With Photoshop I am able to alter the text in ways that I have never done before, such as taking away and stripping down, which is difficult to achieve when physically altering it by hand. By doing this I am obscuring the viewers’ ability to read the quote, which in turn questions the purpose of the text, if it cannot be read then is it still regarded as a piece of text, or has that changed the text into an unlikely image. However if the audience is able to decode the text and is able to read it then does it still keep its purpose? Or does it take on the role of an image as oppose to being just texts.

Michelangelo was known to be sexist and completely is obsessed with the male beauty, to the point that he would use only male models even when painting or sculpting female figures, he thought that males were at the top of the food chain and females beneath. From my earlier experiments I used Photoshop to perform a series of different experiments in which I either stripped the text apart or layered on top of it to the point of difficultly in reading.

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Using technology to strip away the power of the text and then attempting to mend it back, by using the old way of fixing clothing, which is stitching; by stitching I am bringing back the old traditions. Stitching is an important tool that we still use today. The whole point to stitch is to fix and mend, which is an important trait for women up until the 20th century, to weave the stitching into an attractive pattern is an added bonus, making them more attractive and eligible for marriage.

When stitching with wire I intend to mend the faded, barely-there text but instead of choosing sewing thread the material I choose was beading wire, as I didn’t want the final results to appear perfect, therefore breaking the tradition that the roles and intentions of stitching and sewing and of women.

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